Reviews of the Book

Mark Murphy, publisher of “Inside the Auburn Tigers” magazine, included a review of Auburn’s Unclaimed National Championships in the December 2012 issue. The review was written by David Rosenblatt, a retired archivist for the Auburn University Athletic Department’s Lovelace Athletic Museum. While I’m not able to reproduce here all of David Rosenblatt’s review, here are a few excerpts:

If you and I were asked how many national football titles Auburn University has won, we would answer two: one in 1957 and in 2010. In his groundbreaking new book, Auburn’s Unclaimed National Championships, …, Michael Skotnicki, an attorney and graduate of Auburn University, offers both a legal and philosophical case for why Auburn’s 1910, 1913, 1914, 1958, and 1983, and 2004 teams are worthy of being recognized as ‘National Champions.”

This book also emphasizes some philosophical reasons for Auburn to claim the additional titles. First of all other universities have added national championships to their official records based on exactly the criteria laid out in this book.  …. The author’s philosophical argument is that Auburn should do the same thing. That is a question made more interesting by noting that Notre Dame, Southern Cal, Michigan, Pitt, Minnesota, Tennessee, and Illinois have recently retroactively added national championships to their official records. A philosophical question is: Should Auburn be following Alabama, and the schools noted above, in this endeavor?

I recommend the book  Auburn’s Unclaimed National Championships for Auburn fans and others to read and make up their minds on this subject.

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